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1 day ago

Tax Advantage

Three ways to love your job more:

1: Declutter your office.
When people feel low on energy, often it’s because they’re not clearing out as they go. Their inbox is overflowing. Their desk is a disaster. Their file drawers are jammed. Decluttering is liberating and empowering.

2. Find a positive image to inspire you and help you cope with a job.
Tape a picture of a special image and mount it on your office wall, away from your computer and phone. That way, you’ll have to turn to look directly at it, which can be transporting.
The very action of directing your attention away from your work opens up the door in your day for a respite, a restart, and a new view.

3. Finally, laugh more.
A recent Gallup poll found that people who smile and laugh at work are more engaged in their jobs. And the more engaged you are, the happier and more enthusiastic you’ll be. This won’t just trickle down to the quality of your work; people will want to have you on their team. Plus: couldn’t we all use a laugh?

Take Action:
What will you do this week to love your job more?
If you want to enjoy life and laugh more a simple strategy
contact us with your business, accounting and taxation problems and we will help you over come them

Baptist Lobo
Director

For your Accounting, Taxation and Business Advisory please contact us

Phone # : +64 21 815040
+64 9 8287877
Email:baptist@taxadvantage.co.nz
Web: www.taxadvantage.co.nz
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1 week ago

Tax Advantage

Improve your financial future

If you want a shot at a better financial future, then start now. Don't wait until January 1 to get new habits in place.
One of the smartest things you could do with your money in that time is taking a fresh approach to it. Sometimes we're stuck in a rut, but you can get out of it by this time next year.

There are plenty of ways to get out of a financial rut:
==========================================
Get a budgeting app. I've tried many but currently use PocketSmith.com because I like the "safe balance" feature that tells you immediately if you've spent up to your limit in a category. Seeing that you need to stop spending can even work for groceries. There is always something in the back of the cupboards to eat. Budgeting apps really are magic, make your money go further and force you to think more deeply about what you're spending and saving.

Pay down your debt.
=================
Don't make excuses. Make a game out of paying down an extra $X each week. That might be $5 for some people or $50 for others.

Sort out your KiwiSaver, and your children's KiwiSaver while you're at it.
===============================================
If you're not saving sufficient to get the government contribution (a 50 per cent return for nothing) then increase what you save to get it. If you don't know what fund you're in, call 0800 KIWISAVER right now to find out. If you could stomach a balanced or growth fund, then switch. I did quick calculation for a 35-year-old earning $70,000, who moved their money, for example, from the ASB default fund earning 5.81 per cent per annum over the past decade to the ASB growth fund at 9.78 per cent for the same period, the difference after 15 years would be around $34,000.

Buy your first home, or dare I say it a rental property.
==========================================
If you're not on the property ladder then look for ways that you can be, eventually. Setting goals gets you further financially. It could mean moving to another area, giving up gratuitous spending, saving more into KiwiSaver, and probably most importantly changing your thought patterns. "How can I make this happen?" is a far better narrative to have running around your head than "it's impossible".

Learn/invest in something new.
==========================
If you don't know how the share market works, or funds, find out, although first make sure you're getting your free $521 government contribution every year from KiwiSaver. Then you may want to dip your toe into shares, funds, property syndicates or even peer-to-peer lending. Take a look at platforms such as Sharesies, Hatch, and InvestNow, but don't invest if you still have consumer debt or if you need that money soon.

Crank up your career to the next level.
===============================
Unless you're CEO already, then look at ways you could increase your salary from your day job. Work on your employment brand. But don't fall for lifestyle inflation and spend all the extra income. Also make sure you protect your income by looking after your health and take out insurance to ensure that you don't lose your income and/or assets.

Simplify Christmas.
================
Santa and his budget slayers are on their way. Keeping Christmas under control makes a lot of sense. Set spending limits and stick to them. If you don't know where to start with that go back to last year's bank statements and ruminate over whether your spending made sense.

Start the New Year with some new mantras.
====================================
These are words or phrases you repeat to yourself to get in the right frame of mind. It's the power of positive thinking. They don't need to be "I'm going to make millions". They could be as simple as: "could I use that money more effectively?", "I need to look at my budget first", "this is money not a windfall" or "can I invest that for a better return"?

Baptist Lobo
Director

For your Accounting, Taxation and Business Advisory pleae contact us

Phone # : +64 21 815040
+64 9 8287877
Email:baptist@taxadvantage.co.nz
Web: www.taxadvantage.co.nz
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2 weeks ago

Tax Advantage

How full is your bucket?

There’s a wonderful little book on happiness called How full is your bucket?

Here’s what the book has to say:

Each of us has an invisible bucket. It is constantly emptied or filled, depending on what others say or do to us. When our bucket is full, we feel great. When it’s empty, we feel awful.
Each of us also has an invisible dipper. When we use that dipper to fill other people’s buckets by saying or doing things to increase their positive emotions - we also fill our own bucket.

But when we use that dipper to dip from others’ buckets by saying or doing things that decrease their positive emotions - we diminish ourselves.

Just as a cup spilling over, a full bucket gives us a positive outlook and renewed energy.

Every drop in that bucket makes us stronger and more optimistic.

But an empty bucket poisons our outlook, saps our energy, and undermines our will.

That’s why every time someone dips from our bucket, it hurts us.

So, we face a choice every moment of every day: We can fill one another’s buckets, or we can dip from them. It’s an important choice -- one that profoundly influences our relationships, productivity, health, and happiness.

TAKE ACTION
Get a copy of How Full is Your Bucket? this book and read what it has to say. It is very good!

Here at Tax Advantage our buckets are overflowing and we share that with our customers/clients by helping them to prosper and grow

Please contact us if you want to have that experience

Baptist Lobo
Director

Phone # : +64 21 815040
+64 9 8287877
Email:baptist@taxadvantage.co.nz
Web: www.taxadvantage.co.nz
...

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4 weeks ago

Tax Advantage

11 phrases that will make you more successful in any relationship

The importance of communication

What you say at work is almost as important as what you do at work. Learn the phrases that will help you sound smarter, more respectful, and ultimately help you succeed in any relationship

Cancel meetings with tact
You have to cancel a meeting and come up with a reason—or tell the actual reason. Excuses already sound, well, excuse-y, so to validate your behaviour it’s important to choose the right words. Gary Burnison, author of Lose the Resume, Land the Job, reported for CNBC that standard Stanford business practices include being honest whenever possible, and avoiding typical excuses such as “current meeting running late” and “got a fire to put out.” Instead, validate the significance of the missed appointment by saying “I understand how important this is…” or “I’m really sorry but I have to reschedule.” Then quickly move towards potential dates and times when you can make this happen. Setting an example is one of the best ways to build trust with your work colleagues.

Ask the question
Challenge your assumptions about others by asking a question instead of responding with a statement; this can be a powerful argument avoidance strategy in the workplace, according to Mack Shwab, an executive director at the Dale Carnegie Institute. He recommends getting in the mindset to be a more curious person by asking “Why do you think that?” to gain more information about a person’s stance instead of jumping to conclusions. Want to go even further in your career?
Make them think your solution is their idea
In every classic persuasion training, the “winner” has succeeded by making the other person think their solution was the other person’s own idea. Shwab says it’s no different now. To accomplish this, use more questioning strategies to get them to consider multiple points of view such as: “What would be the benefit if we go that way?” and “What would be the benefit to you if that happens?”

“Emphatically” admitting you’re wrong
We’ve all heard the deep significance of apologizing when you are wrong in a relationship. But the Carnegie institute specifically teaches doing so “emphatically.” For example, instead of just saying “I’m sorry,” elaborate a bit to ensure the other party really feels your emotion. You could say, “Hey, I’m really wrong about that and I’m really sorry.” The emphatic nature of this style of apology diffuses the other person more quickly and also creates a culture where it’s safe to admit mistakes. It’s also a best practice to outwardly say you forgive someone, instead of leaving them to wonder where they stand. It’s also key to not sabotage your own apology.

Avoid the “and/or/but” to demonstrate respect
After pursuing the other person’s viewpoint, it’s imperative to avoid the words “and,” “or,” and “but” to ensure the colleague or boss has felt thoroughly heard. Instead, replace these debate-oriented words with a pause and a breath, then say, “that’s an interesting idea. It triggered a thought in my head,” Shwab recommends. His strategy of separating your colleague’s suggestion from your presentation of your own idea demonstrates respect for them.

Kill them with kindness
We all have that colleague, but we don’t have to be that colleague. Using extreme friendliness with the toughest cookie in your department may not change their generally terrible demeanour towards the world, but you may be the person who, as Shwab calls it, “begins in a friendly way.” He compares it to how a dog acts when they can’t wait to see you, complete with the wagging tail. “You will be shocked by the way they change.” Simply starting with “How are you?” and caring can make a difference. You can even attempt small, intentional acts of kindness in your workplace to improve these relationships.

Acknowledge unsolicited advice
A suggestion is defined as an “idea or plan put forward for consideration.” When you receive unsolicited advice at work, responding with “thanks for the suggestion,” will preserve your integrity when you are annoyed and can simultaneously shut down the advice-giver while making them feel somewhat appreciated (maybe both). After all, their idea is out there for your consideration, not your immediate acceptance, right where advice belongs.

Getting to yes
Sometimes negative colleagues or bosses are simply in a sour mental place and used to saying no. You have the power to get them in a “yes” frame of mind before pitching an idea or requesting something through a series of questions about basic facts, Shwab says. He shares an example of trying to sell a widget in a proposal in which others are already against it. Asking a series of yes or no questions to present the positives will lead to more “yes’s.” “For example, you could ask ‘Do you think it will help our customer base?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘Do you think the new widget would make us more profitable?’ ‘Yes,’” he said. Then you move into the potential problematic areas discussion with this yes mindset prepared.

A compliment plus a reason
We’ve all given and received meaningless compliments. “That’s amazing.” “Great job.” While they are appreciated, it’s so much more meaningful to demonstrate evidence for the compliment with specifics. To make it sound sincere, Shwab says, “You have to substantiate it with evidence…if you don’t give an example it loses all its teeth.” Being authentic is one of the best ways to give a meaningful compliment.

Repeat it back
Listening and relationship experts encourage reciting back someone’s words, in your own words, to ensure you have understood and to communicate that understanding back to the speaker. This can start simply with “What I hear you saying…” or “What I think you are saying…” and then discrepancies can be corrected from there before proceeding onto the real work. According to the Harvard Business Review, people only ever retain half of what you said, so this can ensure you remember at least that much.

Accept compliments graciously
A thank you with a period is more sincere than a “thank you so much” or an “I really appreciate it.” It’s the classiest way to receive a compliment, without any elaboration, self-deprecation (“Thanks. I didn’t work that long on the presentation.”) It demonstrates confidence and appreciation without cockiness or insecurity.

Baptist Lobo
Director

Phone # : +64 21 815040
+64 9 8287877
Email:baptist@taxadvantage.co.nz
Web: www.taxadvantage.co.nz11 phrases that will make you more successful in any relationship

The importance of communication

What you say at work is almost as important as what you do at work. Learn the phrases that will help you sound smarter, more respectful, and ultimately help you succeed in any relationship

Cancel meetings with tact
You have to cancel a meeting and come up with a reason—or tell the actual reason. Excuses already sound, well, excuse-y, so to validate your behaviour it’s important to choose the right words. Gary Burnison, author of Lose the Resume, Land the Job, reported for CNBC that standard Stanford business practices include being honest whenever possible, and avoiding typical excuses such as “current meeting running late” and “got a fire to put out.” Instead, validate the significance of the missed appointment by saying “I understand how important this is...” or “I’m really sorry but I have to reschedule.” Then quickly move towards potential dates and times when you can make this happen. Setting an example is one of the best ways to build trust with your work colleagues.

Ask the question
Challenge your assumptions about others by asking a question instead of responding with a statement; this can be a powerful argument avoidance strategy in the workplace, according to Mack Shwab, an executive director at the Dale Carnegie Institute. He recommends getting in the mindset to be a more curious person by asking “Why do you think that?” to gain more information about a person’s stance instead of jumping to conclusions. Want to go even further in your career?
Make them think your solution is their idea
In every classic persuasion training, the “winner” has succeeded by making the other person think their solution was the other person’s own idea. Shwab says it’s no different now. To accomplish this, use more questioning strategies to get them to consider multiple points of view such as: “What would be the benefit if we go that way?” and “What would be the benefit to you if that happens?”

“Emphatically” admitting you’re wrong
We’ve all heard the deep significance of apologizing when you are wrong in a relationship. But the Carnegie institute specifically teaches doing so “emphatically.” For example, instead of just saying “I’m sorry,” elaborate a bit to ensure the other party really feels your emotion. You could say, “Hey, I’m really wrong about that and I’m really sorry.” The emphatic nature of this style of apology diffuses the other person more quickly and also creates a culture where it’s safe to admit mistakes. It’s also a best practice to outwardly say you forgive someone, instead of leaving them to wonder where they stand. It’s also key to not sabotage your own apology.

Avoid the “and/or/but” to demonstrate respect
After pursuing the other person’s viewpoint, it’s imperative to avoid the words “and,” “or,” and “but” to ensure the colleague or boss has felt thoroughly heard. Instead, replace these debate-oriented words with a pause and a breath, then say, “that’s an interesting idea. It triggered a thought in my head,” Shwab recommends. His strategy of separating your colleague’s suggestion from your presentation of your own idea demonstrates respect for them.

Kill them with kindness
We all have that colleague, but we don’t have to be that colleague. Using extreme friendliness with the toughest cookie in your department may not change their generally terrible demeanour towards the world, but you may be the person who, as Shwab calls it, “begins in a friendly way.” He compares it to how a dog acts when they can’t wait to see you, complete with the wagging tail. “You will be shocked by the way they change.” Simply starting with “How are you?” and caring can make a difference. You can even attempt small, intentional acts of kindness in your workplace to improve these relationships.

Acknowledge unsolicited advice
A suggestion is defined as an “idea or plan put forward for consideration.” When you receive unsolicited advice at work, responding with “thanks for the suggestion,” will preserve your integrity when you are annoyed and can simultaneously shut down the advice-giver while making them feel somewhat appreciated (maybe both). After all, their idea is out there for your consideration, not your immediate acceptance, right where advice belongs.

Getting to yes
Sometimes negative colleagues or bosses are simply in a sour mental place and used to saying no. You have the power to get them in a “yes” frame of mind before pitching an idea or requesting something through a series of questions about basic facts, Shwab says. He shares an example of trying to sell a widget in a proposal in which others are already against it. Asking a series of yes or no questions to present the positives will lead to more “yes’s.” “For example, you could ask ‘Do you think it will help our customer base?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘Do you think the new widget would make us more profitable?’ ‘Yes,’” he said. Then you move into the potential problematic areas discussion with this yes mindset prepared.

A compliment plus a reason
We’ve all given and received meaningless compliments. “That’s amazing.” “Great job.” While they are appreciated, it’s so much more meaningful to demonstrate evidence for the compliment with specifics. To make it sound sincere, Shwab says, “You have to substantiate it with evidence...if you don’t give an example it loses all its teeth.” Being authentic is one of the best ways to give a meaningful compliment.

Repeat it back
Listening and relationship experts encourage reciting back someone’s words, in your own words, to ensure you have understood and to communicate that understanding back to the speaker. This can start simply with “What I hear you saying...” or “What I think you are saying...” and then discrepancies can be corrected from there before proceeding onto the real work. According to the Harvard Business Review, people only ever retain half of what you said, so this can ensure you remember at least that much.

Accept compliments graciously
A thank you with a period is more sincere than a “thank you so much” or an “I really appreciate it.” It’s the classiest way to receive a compliment, without any elaboration, self-deprecation (“Thanks. I didn’t work that long on the presentation.”) It demonstrates confidence and appreciation without cockiness or insecurity.

Baptist Lobo
Director

Phone # : +64 21 815040
+64 9 8287877
Email:baptist@taxadvantage.co.nz
Web: www.taxadvantage.co.nz
...

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2 months ago

Tax Advantage

Good Sleep

We spend up to a third of our life sleeping.

And a good night’s sleep is a proven way to eliminate stress, improve your energy and make you feel positive.

Here are four proven tips to sleeping well...

1. Keep a regular sleep timetable

Keeping a regular sleep timetable by going to bed and waking up at the same time every day will ultimately help you feel energized and refreshed. So set yourself a fixed rest and wake up time that you follow every day, even on weekends.

2. Avoid late night television

Many of us will watch television as a way to wind down at night or fall asleep. But what many people don’t realise is that television actually stimulates the mind, rather than relaxing it.

Late night television usually consists of content that either shows disturbing material or requires us to think and use our brains. The light from the television can also confuse our body clock, making it harder to fall asleep

3. Exercise at the right time

While regular exercise positively impacts sleep quality, it is best done in the earlier part of the day.

Exercise stimulates the body by raising its temperature, so if you exercise later in the evenings you may experience trouble getting to sleep as the body requires a cooler temperature in order to wind down and promote rest.

4. Adopt a pre-bed ritual

Doing activities that help relax the body will make it easier for you to drift off. Things like taking a warm bath, stretching, reading a light book or listening to gentle music will help you wind down after a long day and ultimately send cues to your body that it is almost time to sleep. A calm pre-bed routine will help your body prepare for sleep, allowing you to get to sleep more easily.

Take Action:
So, if you are having difficulties sleeping try adopting some of these tips to improve your sleep quality.

Another way to improve your sleep is to eliminate the stress and worry from your accounting & taxation matters

Tax Advantage could be just what you need to help you get your accurate, timely accounting and taxation advise to keep IRD at bay

Contact us and have a good night sleep while your are assured of your accounting and taxation needs are met

Baptist Lobo
Director

Phone # : +64 21 815040
+64 9 8287877
Email:baptist@taxadvantage.co.nz
Web: www.taxadvantage.co.nz
...

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Baptist Lobo - Tax Advantage

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Please call me now for an appointment to discuss ways in which to help you prosper and grow! The first consultation is free!